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The Diary Of A Rolling Stone

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“Ma! Why does everybody call me MESSY? I don’t like it! ” Misry complained.

Madhavi finished her evening prayers and looked at the child standing by the door with a scornful look on her face. Her long curls doing very little to hide the expression on her small round face.

“Come here my love. Tell me, what is bothering you?” Madhavi replied stretching her arms. Misry didn’t waste a minute and hugged her mother.

“Ma, Raju keeps calling me MESSY. Now the others too have started calling me the same. I am warning you, I will kill Raju.” Misry cried.

Madhavi kissed her and said, “Ok I will tell him, not to bother you anymore. But you too promise me that you will obey him. After all, he is much older to you.”

“But he plays with me and rides my bicycle too.” Misry nagged.

“Just to give you company, sweetheart. You see you have no friends here to play with. If Raju does not play then you will be bored, my child. ” Madhavi reminded her.

Misry thought for a while then replied, “Phulwa and Bheeru are my friends. I can play with them.” She looked very convinced.

“Yes you can. But you see dear they are civilians and not allowed inside the campus. And I cannot allow you to go out of the campus premises.” Madhavi replied.

“But I shall go tomorrow. Bheeru’s goat has given birth to three kids. I want to see them.” Misry begged her mother.

Madhavi knew it will be too hard to stop her little daughter when it comes to animals. Her daughter had inherited her love for animals from her Dadu, who owns a big farm house full of animals in a sleepy town in the outskirts of Howrah.

“Fine. Go in the morning tomorrow.” Madhavi replied.

Misry kissed her mother and ran off to play with her toys.

Madhavi sighed. Life was very different since they shifted to the border out post. Misry was missing both her friends and school. She was five years old and loved being in a big family. Madhavi had moved to her parent’s house for her delivery. Misry was born there and spent her growing years in her Dadu’s  house. She was always surrounded with cousins, aunts and uncles and not to mention the animals for company.

Misry’s father, Anurag, worked in B.S.F and work kept him away from family for long time. So it was not possible for him to take care of his pregnant wife. Hence he had sent his wife to her parent’s place. Misry was born there. Anurag used to visit them quite often.

When Misry was three years old Madhavi moved in with her husband. At that time Anurag was stationed in the Head Quarter and thus the family had good time for the next two years. But soon Anurag was stationed in the border outpost.

The border outposts are situated near international borders. Anurag was stationed in a small village near the Indo-Bangladesh border in Bihar. During that era, the officers were allowed to keep their family along in the border outpost. Since Misry was too young, there was no point in leaving his family alone in the Head Quarter. So Madhavi shifted in with her husband away from the pleasures of Movie Theater, big markets, weekly markets, welfare association, ladies club, parties and above all electricity.

It was the era when TV had not invaded our lives. And tape recorder and stereo were still considered a luxury. The comfort of electricity was limited to a mere an hour or two in the evening and that too by a generator for the residence. Rest of the evening, the rooms would lit up with the dim lights of the lanterns and lamps.

The family sat together around it and spent time chatting with each other. Sometimes, they would even indulge in listening to the plays on the radio or sing folk songs or movie songs together. And there was plenty of time to watch the night sky. It was the activity Misry enjoyed most with her father lying on the cot in the backyard and counting the satellites or listenening to stories from him. She also loved wearing her half saree and dance to the music on the record player.

As  Anurag had night duties quite often, Madhavi had invited her younger sister Pallavi, who had just finished college, to stay over until her marriage was fixed by her parents. Pallavi readily agreed and was escorted by her nephew Raju, who had failed twice in his metric examination and showed no interest in studying further. Misry loved their company in the house and so did her parents.

And thus Misry alias Messy lived happily with her family and friends in a world that she believe existed and kept the adults, in the household, on their toes always till they shouted on top of their voice, “GROW UP MESSY”.

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Flicker photo

*****

 

*Glossary: Dadu – Maternal grandfather.

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Marriages Made in India

Book #1
THE SMITTEN HUSBAND
by
Sundari Venkatraman

Blurb

Ram Maheshwari is a successful jewellery designer who has a huge showroom on MI Road, Jaipur. He’s tall, dark, handsome and a billionaire to boot. He’s twenty-nine and falls in with his parents’ wishes when they try to arrange his marriage.
The lovely, stormy-eyed Sapna Purohit is from Pushkar. She’s managed to finish school and makes a living by doing mehendi designs during weddings. She’s always dreamt of a Prince on a white horse, sweeping her off her feet.
One look into Sapna’s grey eyes and Ram is lost. Only, Sapna’s unable to see her Prince in Ram. Being from a poor family, she has no choice but to go along with the tide when the Maheshwaris offer to bear all expenses of the wedding. 
Does that mean that the feisty Sapna is all set to accept Ram as her husband? She puts forth a condition, after the wedding. Will The Smitten Husband agree to it?
*MARRIAGES MADE IN INDIA is a five-novella series that revolves around the characters you have met in The Runaway Bridegroom.
Read an excerpt…

“Good morning!” said a sleepy voice. “What are you doing so far away?” called out Ram, before reaching out with a long arm to pull her to him.
A startled Sapna gave him a shocked look that was lost on her husband, whose eyes were still closed. His arms went around her waist like steel bands, his breath hot against her cheek. “Sapna…” he whispered in her ear as his hard lips pressed into her petal soft cheek.
Sapna tried to pull out of his arms, only to have them pull her closer. Her breasts were flattened against his solid chest. Her traitorous body seemed to enjoy the pressure as her nipples perked up. She did her best to hold on to the control that was slipping fast.
“Ram,” she called out loudly, hoping to wake him up. She couldn’t free her arms that were trapped against her own body, as he held her in a crushing grip. His mouth was busy exploring her face, moving inexorably towards her lips. His eyes continued to remain closed, while his hands moved restlessly at her waist. “Ram…” her voice came out in a whisper, as she felt his tongue trace the edge of her lips. Tortured, she made the final move to capture his roving lips, breaking free her hands to hold his face steady.
“Sapna…” sighed Ram, kissing her gently, his tongue first tracing her upper lip and then her lower one. He gently bit the luscious curve. Sapna instinctively opened her mouth to let him explore the velvety cavern with his tongue. Shyly, her tongue reached out to mate with his, making Ram groan with need.
His hands moved restlessly on her body, her nightie bunching up. His muscular legs tangled with her slim ones, making her sigh with pleasure as his hard and hairy skin brushed against her soft and silky one. His hands cupped her lush bottom, caressing it lovingly.
Sapna suddenly became aware of his hardness pressed against her belly. Coming to her senses, she turned her face away, breaking the kiss. “No Ram.”
His wet lips continued to caress her, his tongue exploring her shell-like ear. Even as her heart thudded loudly, Sapna pushed against him. “Ram, please, will you stop it?”
His black eyes opened a slit, desire and slumber at war in them. “Sapna?” If he hadn’t been fully awake before, he was now, as he stared at her lovely face that was so close to his. He slowly recalled what had been occurring over the past few minutes. He had at first thought he was dreaming about kissing the luscious woman in his arms. How had she landed there in the first place?
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#TSH #1 Bestseller on Amazon.in

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About The Author

The Smitten Husband is the eighth book authored by Sundari Venkatraman. This is a hot romance and is Book #1 of the 5-novella series titled Marriages Made in India. Other published novels by the author are The Malhotra Bride, Meghna, The Runaway Bridegroom, The Madras Affair and An Autograph for Anjali—all romances. She also has a collection of romantic short stories called Matches Made in Heaven; and a collection of human interest stories called Tales of Sunshine. All of Sundari Venkatraman’s books have been on Amazon Top 100 Bestsellers in India, USA, UK & Australia many times over.


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“Completing a book in any genre gives you an adrenaline rush equivalent to that of winning a medal.”
– Usha Narayanan.

Today on the Blog Guest Post we have with us the bestselling author, Usha Narayanan whose books have been loved by both adults and young adults alike. With top selling books like The Madras Mangler, Love,Lies and Layoffs, Pradyumna: Son of Krishna in her kitty she has won many hearts. Her latest book,The Secret of God’s Son, published by Penguin, is a sequel of Pradyumna: Son of Krishna and is already a bestseller. Today she is going to reveal her writing secret.

Me : Your first book, ‘The Madras Mangler’ was a thriller. Then you switched to mythology with ‘Pradyumna: Son of Krishna’ and ‘The Secret of God’s Son.’ You have also written romcom with ‘Love, Lies and Layoffs.’

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Usha Narayanan

My question, which genre did you enjoy writing the most?

Paromita, I thought I could answer your question by drawing parallels to the Olympic Games that have just concluded. Completing a book in any genre gives you an adrenaline rush equivalent to that of winning a medal. The journey is similar too ― the labour, the breakthrough, the finish line and hopefully the spotlight and applause.  ‘The Madras Mangler’ I would say is like synchronized swimming, an exercise that is both spectacle and sport. Writing a thriller requires perfect timing too and must lead to a finish that sets your heart pounding. Just as this sport demands huge levels of stamina, the thriller too calls for immense staying power as you execute quick moves that tantalize and entertain. The choreography takes place both above and below the water, as you make your victims and suspects tumble and somersault, thereby increasing the suspense and drama.

‘Love, Lies and Layoffs’ is like badminton, the sport made popular in India by our own Sindhu. A romcom, just like the game, features two lively players exchanging quick flurries and exhibiting swift reflexes. The players, both men and women, compete individually and in teams, for we must not forget the families and friends on either side, cheering or heckling from the sidelines! Both make for a spellbinding spectacle. However, in the game, we have only one winner whereas the romcom has two, with the lovers, find their happily ever after.

I think the writing of myth-based fiction such as ‘Pradyumna’ and ‘The Secret of God’s Son’ is similar to running a marathon, a sport that demands immense physical and mental strength. It is a grueling process requiring endurance, focus, skill, flexibility and a nimble mind. And the setting must be massive and spectacular, with huge cheering throngs! The possibility of reaching this pinnacle is what prompts every writer in this genre to take up the challenge.

As you may have inferred, mythology is my current favourite!

 

More about the author

Usha Narayanan had a successful career in advertising, media and corporate communications before becoming a full-time author. She has written several books, including ‘The Madras Mangler’, a suspense thriller, and ‘Love,Lies and Layoffs’, a Harlequin romcom. Her latest is ‘The Secret of God’s Son’, the sequel to her bestselling book,’Pradyumna: Son of Krishna’, both published by Penguin.

When she’s not juggling travelling, writing and interviews, Usha reads everything from thrillers to romances, provided her cat isn’t fast asleep on
her Kindle.

To know more about her, visit www.ushanarayanan.com or email her at author@ushanarayanan.com. Find her also at www.facebook.com/writerusha or tweet @writerusha.

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Media mentions

 
Praise for Pradyumna: Son of Krishna
 
Usha Narayanan has taken a quantum leap . . . to the outright spine-tingling narrative from the leaves of a time before. This book is Indian writing coming of ageFemina
 
Like the best of our mythological tales, this too, is a multilayered one . . .There is valour, there is cowardice, there is glory, there is shame, there is sex, lies and deceptionThe Hindu
 
This engrossing tale takes readers on a mythological sagaTimes of India
 

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 Blurb

 
With this cruel curse on Krishna, Queen Gandhari plunges mankind into the unspeakable evil of the Kali Yuga. 
 
It is up to Pradyumna to try and reverse the dire prediction. To journey into terrifying realms, confront Yama and Shiva, and to vanquish the Kali demon. In order to do so, he must shed all that holds a mortal back—his arrogance, his fears, his baser instincts… He must lead his people out of the swirling vortex of greed, disease and misery. And there is one powerful weapon still…the secret surrounding Pradyumna’s origin.  
 
Will he uncover it in time to fight off the cataclysm? 
In the answer lies the destiny of all humanity! 
 
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Submitting is Not a Dartboard

For all the aspiring writers what rejection means to you?

BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog

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Allison Williams, Brevity‘s globe-trotting social media editor, writes often for this blog on issues of dedication, endurance, and inspiration for writers. Some of those blog posts, along with plenty of new material, have been assembled into Williams’ first book,Get Published in Literary Magazines: The Indispensable Guide to Preparing, Submitting and Writing Better. Brevity Editor Dinty W. Moore recently asked Allison a few questions:
__

Dinty:  There is so much advice for new writers out there. What are you hoping your book will accomplish?

Allison: I want to reposition the submissions process as a matter of great diligence and skill with a dash of luck and timing, rather than the other way around.

Even for writers with a publication record, submitting is scary—we’re all terrified we’re sending to a magazine that’s actually way out of our league, and we all worry that our ego is telling us…

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this book has ignited the ‘KINDNESS’ in me

How have you felt when some fine day you plan to go back from your work on-time but as soon as you are all set to go…you are expected to go through a file which needs your attention? Feeling somewhat irritated? Ok… let’s take a step deeper. Now, you know that this could have been taken care of either tomorrow or maybe you could just continue working as per your office schedule but at least not today; still, your boss (or say your vendor) expects your immediate attention into the matter. Feeling bit frustrated? Accepted… let’s move a step ahead…

Just when you are set into the matter in hand, your junior expects you for some important task in hand. I am sure you would feel like pushing him out of the cabin… but the drama doesn’t ends here… While you are working out a solution within the confines of your neurons you receive a call from your spouse who is waiting for you with kids since past couple of hours….. I understand…at present, you must be feeling to hit me hard…READ MORE IN THE LINK

Source: Book Review: Shamsuddin’s Grave; Author – Paromita Goswami, Publisher: Partridge India

getty_rm_photo_of_little_girl_sleeping_at_school

Teacher’s Day just went by. However, I didn’t get a chance to wish my teachers for their immense contribution in shaping me up for what I am today. I thank you all for your words, discipline and thoughts that will remain with me forever.

Now I want to scream about some issue that has been burning my pocket since I got my child into school. Nothing is familiar to what we had experienced in the name of education. In our times, the emphasis was more on knowledge as in understanding the facts and figures and how it can or has changed our lives. However, now I find the education more like a jack of all trades and master of none. The syllabus is more vast and impractical. Rather it is making the children burdened more with what little they could grasp.

Anyways today I don’t want to talk about this. What I want to know is how much does it cost you per month to enroll your child in one of the best private schools of your locality? And is the education that your child is attaining there worth the amount.

I am sharing an experience here of the school my child goes to. Since he got into middle grade this year, the school curriculum has added self-defense – Karate classes into his syllabus. Well, that is real good for my child is going to learn something good.

I have to add that we live in a city that has very scorching summers wherein the temperature touches about 45 degrees during the daytime. Now my child goes to school at 9:30a.m and after two periods of forty-five minutes each, it is lunch time. Well, so far it is going fine. Now comes the trouble that I want to share.

After the lunch break of half an hour, his class goes for KARATE session once a week.

Now if I understand clearly it is already noon and physical activity like KARATE is right after the lunch. So could anyone please tell me how it benefits my child other than hampering his digestion process?

And as if that’s not all, I have been told that the KARATE session is in the open for fifteen minutes. So what about the heat? And above all, the school wants me to shell out six hundred rupees for his KARATE uniform that will be available from the school. WHY???

I don’t want my child to attend this session. This strains him for the rest of the day. Moreover, he is too young to change his dress all by himself for that matter. At home when he goes to school I and my husband are after him to dress him up properly. The biggest problem he faces is tying his shoe lace. So let’s say I buy the KARATE uniform, and then my concern is how my child will dress up appropriately without any help for the rest of the day.

This is just one scenario that I shared. We have to spend a good amount of money for the education. I know it is pretty expensive nowadays. But then when I am already bearing his transportation and tuitions fees every month why do you keep burdening me with miscellaneous charges like scholarship entrance, horse riding, midbrain activation, magazine purchasing, newsletter purchasing and much more.

If that is not all, you ask me to contribute six hundred rupees towards his annual function participation. Which you mentioned includes his costume charges, refreshments etc. But on the annual function day, I didn’t get a chance to see my child on stage performing because you had forty-five students participating in that song which lasts for merely three minutes. I didn’t know which color costume he was wearing and in which row he was standing to perform. And when I went to collect him after the performance you have already changed his dress and removed his makeup. All I found there was a tired, hungry, exhausted boy waiting to be taken home immediately. Oh yes did I mention that for a performance at 7:30p.m my child was sent to school at reporting time 1:00 pm which means he had boarded the school bus at 12:00p.m. What kind of management is this??

Even after all these mentioned above, I would like to share about the teaching process. Just before the exams, the teachers think of completing her course and for that, she has the authority to call students in double shifts. I would like to mention here that my child’s timetable shows computer classes three times a week. The respective teacher failed to complete the syllabus within that time period for reasons best known to her. Moreover, there is no written notice from the school about this schedule.

My child forgot to inform me about his enrollment in the double shift program for his computer classes. All he said was that he was asked to come in the morning shift and hence left home at 6:45a.m. I waited for him to return after the first shift was over but he eventually returned at 3:30p.m hungry, tired and completely drained of any strength.

 

So what are we trying to make here? A child, who is totally exhausted, burdened with studies pressure, irritated and totally uninterested in activities. Is this what we want when we send our child to these awesome institutes, burning holes in our pocket thinking of their brilliant future?

THE BROKEN HOME
English Translation of 
Rabindranath Tagore’s 
Nastanirh
by
LOPAMUDRA BANERJEE
 
Blurb
 
The Broken Home (Nastanirh), the novella, takes place in late 19th-century Bengal and explores the lives of the aristocratic Bengali gentry who were part of the Indian Renaissance. Within the peripheries of such a distinct, culturally liberal society, the world of Charulata, Bhupati and Amal unfolds. Charu, the dreamy, melancholic young woman dreams of an idyllic literary world where she and her brother-in-law Amal, a budding writer would remain two discreet, indispensable entities. However, Amal’s estrangement destroys her creative passions and creates an ocean of turmoil in her life that turns her marital world upside down. Her husband, Bhupati, despite his liberal ideas, is blind to her loneliness and dissatisfaction. It is only with the appearance of his cousin, Amal, in their lives, who incites passionate feelings in Charu, that Bhupati realizes what he has lost.


Nastanirh is the basis for the noted film, Charulata (1964), by Satyajit Ray. 

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About the Author


 

 

Lopamudra Banerjee is a writer, poet and translator, currently based in Dallas, USA. She is the co-editor of ‘Defiant Dreams: Tales of Everyday Divas’, published by Readomania in collaboration with Incredible Women of India. Her unpublished memoir Thwarted Escape has been First Place Category Winner at the Journey Awards 2014 hosted by Chanticleer Reviews and Media LLC. She is also the Creative Editor of Incredible Women of India and a resident editor with Readomania.

Her poems, stories and essays have appeared at numerous literary journals and anthologies, both in India and the US.  She is a regular contributor for Café Dissensus, Different Truths, Readomania.com. She has received the Reuel International Award 2016 for translation also a Certificate of Merit as part of the Reuel International Award 2015 for Writing and Literature. 

 

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RIGHTFULLY WRONG, WRONGFULLY RIGHT
by
Varsha Dixit
 
 
 
Blurb
 
Love is in the air again…this time it’s steamy, bold and manipulative!
Gayatri and Viraj both are products of childhood trauma. Yet they were able to survive, one because of her shrewdness and the other because of his genius. Rightfully Wrong Wrongfully Right, the final part in the best selling ‘Right and Wrong’ love trilogy is the story of these two damaged souls.
Gayatri Dutta, the poster child for rich spoiled diva is fighting to escape a life of servitude her tyrant father is hell bent on pushing her into. Her past string of failures have her backed against a wall. Lonely and desperate!
Viraj is a con who uses his genius to perpetuate his isolation. His life once of violence and abuse has left him cynical and cold. He shuns the society and its hypocrisies. 
And then Gayatri and Viraj cross paths. She needs him and he despises her.
To Viraj, Gayatri, is the epitome of all that he despises, shallow, manipulative and the kind who uses her beauty as a weapon. Or is she?
Gayatri sees Viraj only as a means to an end. She is sure that Viraj with his nerdy demeanor, owlish glasses and crude behavior will be easy to manipulate and walk over. Only he isn’t!
 
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Excerpt from #RWWR
‘I can do this, I can do this, I can…’ Gayatri wound her fingers tightly around her cellphone as she made her way to the cubbyhole Viraj called his office. I did not expect a freaking hug, but a polite ‘how are you’ wouldn’t kill that man. She rapped her knuckles on the door.
Viraj swung the door open. ‘What?’ His brows were furrowed and his lips, pursed.
Gayatri remembered what Nikhil had said to her once. Dr Viraj owns and runs this lab. He was the only one you needed to impress! ‘It’s my first day here!’ Gayatri could hear her voice shake. ‘Could you tell me
Gayatri scuttled out of Viraj’s way as he leaned out. ‘Find an empty room, do your work there. You are free to leave any time you want. You are free to come or to not come.’ The door shut on her face.
Flabbergasted, Gayatri kept staring at the door. What just happened? She cleared her throat. I should not piss him off anymore. ‘Thank you for this…this job.’ Her voice was as uncertain as the look on her face.
Viraj tugged the door open again. Gayatri flashed a smile at him and opened her mouth to speak but he stopped her short. ‘I don’t like talking. Find a room and stay there.’ He shut the door on her again.
 Asshole! Gayatri fisted her hands and retreated. I can do this! I am doing this! Bigger picture, please! Gayatri paused and peeped inside the first lab that she stumbled upon. The place was quiet except for a low hum of machines. Gayatri pushed the doors open and walked inside the lab. It was empty. ‘Does anyone else work here besides the mad scientist?’ She leaned against one of the steel racks. The door flew open behind her. With a big grin she turned to greet the person coming in. ‘Hi! I’ she froze. It was the mad scientist with a bunch of papers in his hand.
Viraj noticed Gayatri at the same time. A familiar irritation flashed in his eyes. ‘Not this room. Not my lab! Find another room!’ He spoke with cool authority.
‘I was just looking!’ Gayatri smoothed her ponytail trying to mask her nervousness. He had her in knots.
Giving an indifferent shrug, Viraj walked past her. Gayatri got a whiff of his aftershave; it smelled clean and crisp, like water with a twist of lemon. At least he doesn’t stink like his manners! Gayatri stood there quiet and confused.
A loose paper slipped from Viraj’s hand and landed on the floor.
‘You dropped some paper!’ Gayatri said, her voice friendly.
‘Ignore it. Like you, it is not going anywhere.’ Viraj pulled a portable stool and took a seat in front of an electronic panel fixed to a bigger panel.
Gayatri gritted her teeth and grinned with the ferocity of a wild animal that could pounce any moment.
Unknown to her, Viraj gave a similar smile except his was more like the wild animal that had pounced and won.
‘I’ll go and find a room. Thank you!’ Swiveling on her heel, Gayatri headed for the door.
Something stopped herher father’s face and the realization that two weeks ago she had physically fought for herself, and now she had to fight again but with her mind instead of hands. I have to win over Mr Madness. Maybe I could wear a beaker over my head and tattoo the periodic table on my arms!
‘If you are trying to open the door telepathically, let me be the first to tell you it is not working!’
Gayatri exhaled noisily. Scathing and sarcastic, what more could a woman ask for? Taking a few calming breaths, she slowly pivoted to face Viraj, specifically his back as he sat hunched fiddling with the panel in front of him.
 ‘I’m sorry if I have offended you somehow. I really need this job. And also, I’m qualified for it. I can show you my degrees. I can really make a difference here.’
Hearing Gayatri’s words and her apologetic tone, something melted inside Viraj…again. But to keep up appearances, he turned rude. ‘I’m busy!’ he barked.
 ‘Please Mr Viraj, give me’ Just then, without warning, someone swung the door open. Gayatri wasn’t prepared for the push. ‘Ouch!’ She toppled. Her desperate hands grabbed the first thing in the vicinitya steel rack. The rack shuddered violently and some of its contents landed on the floor.
‘What the hell!’ Viraj bellowed jumping to his feet.
Gayatri winced. A large electrical component had crashed into her hand ‘The door just opened, pushing me in,’ she said shaking her arm in pain.
 Viraj glared at the door. He instantly lost the frown and his mouth eased at the ends. ‘Oh it’s you! Come inside!’
Huh, Hyde turns Jekyll! Gayatri spun around.
A timid, bespectacled, five-foot-nothing girl, her long hair in a tight braid, clad in a pastel-coloured salwaar kameez, stood at the door. Her skin was smooth and her hands kept tugging at the dupatta around her neck ‘Sorry to interrupt! Dr Kalra wanted to show you some tests he is about to run in lab 2.’ She then glanced at Gayatri. ‘I’m sorry if I hurt you. It was an accident.’
Gayatri was about to speak but Viraj cut her off. ‘She’s fine. Let’s go!’
Viraj went out with the girl, not even sparing a glance at Gayatri.
Astounded, Gayatri watched them leave.

 

Urghh…the shit-faced scientist actually smiled and that too at that girl! Gayatri kicked the steel rack. It shuddered again! Shoot! Before anything else would fall on her, Gayatri went after the scientist and the simpleton.
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About the author
 
Varsha Dixit
Varsha Dixit, the bestselling author of four successful contemporary romance books. Her debut book, Right Fit Wrong Shoe was a national bestseller for the year 2010. Varsha was a part of the Indian Television Industry and worked as an assistant director and online editor. She considers herself a dreamer who thinks deep but writes light. Even though creativity is gender free,Varsha feels blessed and enriched to be a woman. Currently, with her family, Varsha resides in CA, USA.
 
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Where I feel my book is different is that I have stuck to the original as much as possible and the book is not just one character’s perspective – Karthik Rao

Today on our Blog Guest Post we have Karthik K.B. Rao, the 32-year-old software professional turned author based in Bangalore. Karthik says that he gets to meditate close to 3 hours every day on his bike thanks to the notorious Bangalore traffic. His hobbies include following cricket, Indian politics on the social media and Indian mythology. He also plays plastic ball cricket with his sons.

 

 

Today he will share with us some unpublished facts about his debut book The Mahabharata Code.

What makes your book, The Mahabharata Code, different from other books in the mythological genre? Is this part of a series?

This is not part of a series but I might write a sequel to this book which might have little/nothing to do with the Mahabharata.

The facet of Indian mythology my book is mostly focussed on is trying to prove their historicity itself. Were they actually a part of our history or were they mere made up fictional moral science stories? Where I feel my book is different is that I have stuck to the original as much as possible and the book is not just one character’s perspective. I have made a humble attempt to give scientific rational explanations to events described in these epics using concepts of physics, modern day technology as well as some of the practices followed in the software industry I am part of. I have also tried to explore further and explain some of the uncomfortable sections described in these epics like why did Rama ask Sita to undergo agnipariksha?  Why did Dronacharya ask Ekalavya his thumb as guru-dakshina? I have also used some of the ideas from books like chariots of god and tv series like Ancient aliens.

 

 

 
THE MAHABHARATA CODE
by
KARTHIK K.B.RAO
 


Blurb

 
“The Mahabharata Code is a personal account of the main protagonist Narayan Rao (NR), who claims to be an astronomer with NASA. NR and a few other crew members agree to take part in the NASA mission to visit this mystery planet from which they had received mysterious signals. Here, they meet a man with a long flowing white beard, and he introduces himself as Vyasa. He reveals that he has a crazy plan in mind and seeks NR and his members’ help in implementing this plan. He intends to recreate the entire Mahabharata on this planet to restore the faith of the primitive simpletons here. 
 
As the Mahabharata incidents start unfolding, NR realizes that Vyasa intends to recreate them page by page here, if not paragraph by paragraph. Also NR begins to realize that his son, Krishna, who is being groomed by Vyasa as Vishnu’s avatar, is nothing more than a pawn in Vyasa’s scheme of things. Other incidents of Mahabharata also unfold according to the original epic. Pandavas and Kauravas grow up hating each other and finally the restaging plan culminates with both the warring sets of cousins facing each other in the battlefield of Kurukshetra. 

Inexplicably, like the original epic, Arjuna develops cold feet seeing his own cousins, teachers and relatives on the opposite side. He seeks Krishna’s divine intervention. Is the brainwashed “alien” Krishna prepared for this intervention?”


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VIKRAM RANA INVESTIGATES
BY
SHARMISHTHA SHENOY
 
BLURB
 
Vikram Rana Murder Mysteries set in Hyderabad…… 
 
The Mysterious Affair of the Lohia Mansion 
 
When the glamourous socialite Richa Lohia is poisoned in her mansion in Jubilee Hills, her brother-in-law hires his mate, ex-cop Vikram Rana, to solve this murder. This is Vikram’s first case and he, along with Inspector Gopi Reddy, must solve the case even if they face opposition from the richest and powerful family in Hyderabad, who would stop at nothing to defend themselves. 
 
The Sonia Sinha Case 
 
When property developer Krishna Dhavala is stabbed to death in Necklace Road, everyone suspects Mrs. Dhavala to be the murderer of her alcoholic and abusive husband. But is that really the case? Vikram Rana and Inspector Reddy have a tough time uncovering the murderer and Vikram himself almost dies trying to solve this case. Experience the mystery along with the duo as they fight their way through the maze of lies, deceit and greed. 
 
Read an excerpt…

 

From “The Mysterious Affair of the Lohia Mansion”

“Kinshuk sprang out of bed and followed his uncle, Rohan along the passage to his mother Richa’s bedroom.

Rohan’s wife, Kiara joined them along with Richa’s personal maid Lakshmi and two more servants. Everyone seemed to be in a state of awestricken fear.

Kinshuk turned to his uncle, ‘What should we do? Father is not here.’

Never had Kinshuk’s weak nature been more apparent, Rohan thought in distaste. Rohan rattled the handle of his sister-in-law Richa’s door violently, but with no effect. The whole household was aroused by now. The most alarming sounds were audible from the interior of the locked bedroom. Clearly something must be done.”

What could have been going on the room? What triggered it?

Mrs Lohia was lying in her bed having seizures. In her agony she must have overturned the bedside table. As they entered, her limbs relaxed and she fell back on her pillow.

“I cannot see properly” she complained. Rohan and Kinshuk looked at each other helplessly. A strangled cry from the bed startled them. A fresh bout of pain had seized Richa. The seizures were terrible to behold. At that moment dr Agnihotri pushed his way into the room authoritatively. At the same instant, Richa cried “Rohan…. Rohan” then she fell back on the pillows motionless. 

Why was Richa killed? Why did she take Rohan’s name?

From the Sonia Sinha case:

“He reached the meeting place at 8 pm sharp. The headlights of his car revealed a woman in a burqa waiting by the roadside. She waved her hand. Krishna stopped the car and she got in. As she removed her veil, Krishna started in surprise. At the same time another man got into the back of his car. Confused, Krishna looked at the man. Then his eyes widened in fear.”

Whom did Krishna see? Who was the woman in burqa?

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About the author
 
 
Sharmishtha Shenoy
 
Sharmishtha Shenoy loves writing murder mysteries, the kind of books that she herself likes to read. Her favorite authors are Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie. She also likes the work of Satyajit Ray – especially the Feluda Series. She was born in Calcutta and has done her post-graduation from University of Reading, Great Britain. She lives in Hyderabad.
 
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